Arqueología de la Arquitectura, No 9 (2012)

La tradición constructiva de la alta Edad Media en Gran Bretaña

Mark Gardiner

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3989/arqarqt.2012.11607

Resumen


En la Gran Bretaña de la alta Edad Media se solían construir las viviendas de madera y por consiguiente no queda ninguna estructura en pie. Así, se han adoptado varios enfoques para interpretar las características de dichas viviendas, como el análisis de la madera saturada de agua, la recreación de la metodología de trabajo y la reconstrucción de edificios, así como los tradicionales análisis de las plantas de las construcciones en las excavaciones. La atribución étnica de las viviendas en Gran Bretaña resulta especialmente difícil porque rara vez se han identificado las tradiciones constructivas de Inglaterra y Escocia. No obstante, se ha argumentado que es posible identificar a una tradición característica de construcción en madera que se mantuvo del siglo V al siglo XI e incluso hasta el siglo XII y que se puede encontrar en toda Inglaterra y en el sur de Escocia.

Palabras clave


Tradición constructiva; etnicidad; construcciones en madera; madera saturada de agua

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Referencias


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